The Cause

Never Forget, Forever Honor
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ABOUT

Legacy Expeditions values those who serve and protect our great nation. To honor their sacrifices, we dedicate each expedition to the fallen Marines, soldiers, sailors, and airmen who gave their lives during the Global War on Terror.

MISSION

These exceptional Americans have demonstrated selfless acts of courage, bravery, and valor in defense of our liberties and freedoms.

While we could never repay this debt, Legacy Expeditions partners with the Special Operations Warrior Foundation, a non-profit that provides financial support to help the children of fallen Special Operations soldiers get an education. That’s only part of what this incredible organization does to thank our nation’s heroes – a mission we’re honored to support.

Viking Sky Expedition- Iceland 2022

An adrenaline-filled skydiving adventure through the land of fire and ice named ‘Viking Sky: Iceland.’ Mike Sarraille and Andy Stumpf embarked on this journey in memory of fallen special operations forces and military service members.

Sean Flynn (SOC SEAL)

(1970-2009)
(1970-2009):
On February 1, 2009, SOC (SEAL) Sean Flynn peacefully passed away from cancer. He was a highly decorated Special Operations Chief who earned three Bronze Stars with Valor and numerous other awards. Chief Flynn loved skydiving and was a certified advanced free fall instructor, tandem master, and an avid free flyer. He was attached to an East Coast-based SEAL team.

David Hall (Navy SEAL)

(1972-2020)

(1972-2020):
David “Dave” Lee Hall, was one of the youngest men to become a Navy SEAL. Dave graduated from BUD/S Training Class 189. He completed four platoons at SEAL Team FIVE and was known for his wit, performance, high standards, and love for protecting his country. Dave spent five years at a Special Mission Unit and deployed multiple times to Middle East combat zones. Dave continued to work in the Defense Industry where he was able to use his unique skills, consulting for counter-insurgency operations. Dave passed away on October 12, 2020.

Tech. Sgt. Sean Harvell (Air Force CCT)

(1983-2016)
(1983-2016):
Combat controller, Tech Sgt. Sean Harvell was one of the legends of the Air Force special operations community, who received two Silver Stars for actions in Afghanistan, on the second person—and the first Airman, to receive two such awards during the Global War on Terror. Sean passed away on April 26, 2016, when he drowned near his home in Long Beach, CA. He was preceded in death by his brother, Andy Harvell, also a combat controller, who was killed on Extortion 17.

Charles Keating IV (Navy SEAL)

(1985-2016)
(1985-2016):
Charles Humphrey Keating IV was a United States Navy sailor and Navy SEAL operator. Charlie received the Navy Cross for his actions in battle on March 4, 2016, in Iraq. The Navy Cross is the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps’ second-highest military decoration awarded for members of the Navy who distinguish themselves for extraordinary heroism in combat with an armed enemy force. He was the third American service member to be killed while fighting ISIL in Iraq, in 2016.

Jonas Kelsall (Navy SEAL)

(1979-2011)

In August 2011, Lieutenant Commander (SEAL) Jonas Kelsall was killed in action during a mission in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan. A team of U.S. Army and Afghanistan military members, along with 22 members of the Naval Special Warfare community, quickly responded to help suppress the opposition forces and assist with the evacuation of the high-value target. While returning to base, the CH-47 Chinook Helicopter carrying the team, known as Extortion 17, was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade, killing all members onboard. He was assigned to an East Coast-based SEAL team and was the recipient of two Bronze Stars with Combat “V” device for Valor, among other citations and recognitions.

Senior Chief Petty Officer Shannon Kent (USN)

(1983-2019)
(1983-2019):
Shannon Mary Kent was a United States Navy Senior Chief Petty Officer and Cryptologic Technician, who played a pivotal role in increasing the effectiveness and performance of the Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC) task force leading to initiatives for broader implementation of females in Special Operations Forces (SOF). Shannon was killed on January 16, 2019, in Manbij, Syria, by a suicide attack. Shannon was a decorated servicewoman and received the Bronze Star, Purple Heart, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, and a Combat Action Ribbon posthumously.

Jason Lewis (Navy SEAL)

(1977-2007)
(1977-2007):
Jason Lewis enlisted in the U.S. Navy on February 29, 1996, and went on active duty to begin basic training on July 22, 1996. His first assignment was with SEAL Team Five in Coronado, CA. As an Assault Team Leader for a highly sensitive Joint Task Force Operation in direct support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, he was mortally wounded in a heroic attempt to provide additional security for his team on July 6, 2007. For this action, he was awarded the Bronze Star with Valor.

Brendan Looney (Navy SEAL)

(1981-2010)
(1981-2010):
Navy Lt. (SEAL) Brendan J. Looney was a Naval Academy lacrosse player and commissioned as an intelligence officer. Two years after receiving his commission as an intelligence officer, he graduated from BUD/S training Class 265 and was selected as ‘Honorman’, where his name is engraved in Naval Special Warfare history as the best that Class 265 had to offer. He was a member of SEAL Team Three and deployed as the Alpha Platoon Assistant Officer in Charge to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. He was killed on his 59th mission while conducting combat operations in the Zabul province of Afghanistan on Sept. 21, 2010.

Captain Matthew Manoukian (MARSOC)

(1983-2012)
(1983-2012):
Captain Matthew Manoukian joined the Marine Corps in January 2006 after earning a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science from the University of Arizona. He deployed in support of both Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. In the early morning hours of Aug. 10, 2012, at the Village Stability Platform in Puzeh, following a meeting with local Afghan officials, a rogue local Afghan dressed in a police uniform opened fire on the team’s leadership killing Capt. Manoukian.

Sergeant First Class Dae Han Park (Army Special Forces)

(1975-2011)
(1975-2011):
Sgt. 1st Class Dae Han Park, was assigned to Charlie Company, 3rd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne), Joint Base Lewis-McChord, WA, and was deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom-Afghanistan. Park was killed after his vehicle was struck by an improvised explosive device on March 12, 2011, in the vicinity of Kajran, Daykundi, Afghanistan. Park’s awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal, two Army Commendation Medals, among others, as well as posthumously awarded the Purple Heart.

Remington Peters (Navy SEAL)

(1975-2018)
(1975-2018):
Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Petty Officer 1st Class Remington Peters died on May 28th in a parachute demonstration accident at Liberty State Park in New Jersey in support of Fleet Week New York 2017. Peters enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 2008 and graduated from BUD/S with Class 276 in April 2010. He was known as a fierce warrior and guardian with a larger-than-life personality that included loyalty to family and friends, his faith, and intense pride for America. His awards include the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, and Combat Action Ribbon, among many others.

Gunnery Sergeant Diego Pongo (MARSOC)

(1985-2020)
Gunnery Sergeant Pongo was assigned to the Marine Raider Regiment in January of 2017, where he performed duties as the Regional Operations Chief. GySgt. Pongo was killed in action on March 8, 2020, while accompanying Iraqi Security Forces in North Central Iraq. Gunnery Sergeant Pongo’s personal awards include the Bronze Star Medal with combat “V”, Purple Heart, and Navy-Marine Corps Commendation Medal with Gold Star in lieu of 2nd award, among other awards.

Captain Kate Hendricks Thomas (USMC)

(1980-2022)
(1980-2022):
A former Marine Corps officer, died on April 5, 2022, at the age of 42. In 2018, she was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer believed to be connected to burn pit exposure in Iraq. In the years since Thomas tirelessly advocated for herself and other veterans trying to obtain health care and benefits for exposure-related illnesses.

Sergeant First Class Christopher Shaw (Army Special Forces)

(1972-2009)
(1972-2009):
Sgt. 1st Class Christopher D. Shaw was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne), Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. and was deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom-Philippines. Shaw died after his vehicle struck an improvised explosive device on Sept. 29, 2009, on Jolo Island, Philippines. He was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal, the Purple Heart, the Meritorious Service Medal, and the Combat Infantryman Badge. Also killed was Staff Sgt. Jack M. Martin III.

First Lieutenant Ashley White (USA)

(1987-2011)

1st Lt. Ashley White was killed during combat operations in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan in 2011, when the assault force she was supporting triggered an improvised explosive device. Ashley was assigned to the 230th Brigade Support Battalion, 30th Heavy Brigade Combat Team, North Carolina National Guard, Goldsboro, NC and served as a member of a Cultural Support Team attached to a Joint Special Operations Task Force in Afghanistan.

Chad Wilkinson (Navy Seal)

(1975-2018)
Following in the footsteps of his father and uncle who were Navy SEALs, Chad graduated from BUD/s Class 204 in 1996 and went to SEAL Team 8 after completing his medic training at Fort Bragg. After three short years of retirement, Chad was back in uniform and fast-tracked to SEAL Team 6. After giving over 21 years of his life to this nation, Navy SEAL Senior Chief Chad Wilkinson, a decorated Tier One operator, passed away on October 29, 2018. His wife Sara and GORUCK are on a mission to stop veteran suicide and take a deeper look at Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).

Mt. Everest Expedition 2021

Over the course of 15 days, the Mt. Everest Skydiving Expedition team conducted five jumps in the highest drop zones in the world in the Mt. Everest region, honoring the fallen warriors of Extortion 17.

The 30 American deaths represent the most significant loss of U.S. military lives in a single incident in the decade-long war in Afghanistan that began in 2001.

Jonas B.Kelsall (NAVY SEAL)

In August 2011, Lieutenant Commander (SEAL) Jonas Kelsall was killed in action during a mission in the Wardak Province of Afghanistan. A team of U.S. Army and Afghanistan military members and 22 members of the Naval Special Warfare community quickly responded to help suppress the opposition forces and assist with evacuating the high-value target. While returning to base, the CH-47 Chinook Helicopter carrying the team, known as Extortion 17, was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade, killing all members onboard. He was assigned to an East Coast-based SEAL team and was the recipient of two Bronze Stars with Combat “V” device for Valor, among other citations and recognitions. He leaves behind his wife.

Louis J.Anglais (NAVY SEAL)

In August 2012, Special Warfare Operator Master Chief Petty Officer (SEAL) Louis J. Langlais was among 30 United States service members who passed away in the CH-47 Chinook helicopter crash in Wardak province, Afghanistan. The SEAL gave his life in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The Travis Manion Foundation honored MCSO (SEAL) Louis Langlais with 30 other Fallen Heroes through our Character Does Matter program at the Westover School in Middlebury, Conn, on Jan. 18, 2013. He leaves behind his wife and two children.
“Lou Langlais was a Navy SEAL, a precision parachute jumper, and a rock climber who scaled cliffs, sometimes without a rope. With a striking ability to suppress fear, he was known for leading his comrades into dangerous situations with a sense of calm, confidence, and even fun.”– LA Times

Thomas A. Ratzlaff (NAVY SEAL)

In August 2011, Special Warfare Operator Senior Chief (SEAL/SW) Thomas Arthur Ratzlaff was killed when a coalition CH-47 Chinook helicopter crashed in Afghanistan. Senior Chief Ratzlaff was a Naval Special Warfare Operator assigned to an East Coast-based Special Warfare Unit. He was on his 12th deployment in support of the War on Terror, with nine previous deployments to Afghanistan and one to Iraq. His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal for Valor (4 awards), the Joint Service Commendation Medal, the Navy / Marine Corps Commendation Medal, and the Navy / Marine Corps Achievement Medal (2 awards). He has also been awarded the Combat Action Ribbon, Good Conduct Medal (4 awards), National Defense Service Medal, Presidential Unit Citation, Meritorious Unit Commendation, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Kosovo Campaign Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (7 awards), NATO Medal, and both the Rifle and Pistol Marksmanship badges as well as the Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist device. He was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal for Valor (5th award), Defense Meritorious Service Medal, and the Purple Heart. Senior Chief Ratzlaff was awarded the Star of Military Valor, Canada’s second highest military award for valor. Thomas was the only non-Canadian ever to receive this award.

Kraig M. Vickers (USN)

In August 2011, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician Senior Chief Petty Officer (Expeditionary Warfare Specialist/Freefall Parachutist) Kraig M. Vickers of Kokomo, was assigned to an East Coast-based Naval Special Warfare unit, passed away in Wardak province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when his CH-47 Chinook helicopter crashed. Kraig was selected as an NSWDG EOD Operator and assigned to TACDEVRON THREE, where he completed numerous deployments worldwide to support the Global War on Terrorism. Senior Chief Vickers was a highly decorated combat veteran with numerous awards, including the Silver Star, four Bronze Star Medals with “V” Device, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Joint Service Commendation Medal with “V” Device, two Purple Heart Medals, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, three Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals, two Combat Action Ribbons, Presidential Unit Citation, National Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, Iraqi Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, and numerous other personal and unit decorations. He leaves behind his wife and their three children.

Brian R. Bill (NAVY SEAL)

In August 2011, SOC (SEAL) Brian R. Bill, 31, of Stamford, CT, was among 30 United States service members who passed away in the CH-47 Chinook helicopter crash in Wardak province, Afghanistan. The Special Warfare Operator was assigned to a SEAL team supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. He was awarded three Bronze Stars with Valor, a Joint Service Commendation Medal with Valor, a Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, a Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, and two Combat Action Ribbons, and three Good Conduct Medals. The Travis Manion Foundation honored SOC (SEAL) Bill and his two best friends.
“Brian Bill, my cousin, was one of those heroes. Brian was noble, compassionate, gentle, humble, and dedicated to his family and teammates. But what I saw personally was his joy and love for others.” –Brian’s cousin, Julia Davis, Westover School senior

John W. Faas (NAVY SEAL)

SOC (SEAL) John W. Faas was one of 30 United States service members killed in the Aug. 6, 2011, CH-47 Chinook helicopter crash in Wardak province, Afghanistan. He was survived by family and friends; his legacy is remembered through the John Faas Foundation.
“As a principal, you hope you impact kids’ lives, but once in a while, you have a kid that goes through that kind of impact on your life, and I think of John as one of those kids.” – Dean Erickson, via CBS Minnesota

Kevin A. Houston (NAVY SEAL)

In August 2011, SOC (SEAL) Kevin A. Houston passed away in a CH-47 Chinook helicopter crash, killing 29 other United States service members. He lived in Virginia with his wife and three children. Houston was also survived by his mother, Jan Brown, and his brother, Craig.
“He was doing what he always wanted to do, defending the country as a SEAL. He achieved his dream.” – Christopher Kelly, via Cape News

Matthew D. Mason (NAVY SEAL)

A severe arm injury during fighting in Fallujah in 2004 didn’t keep Matthew Mason off the Iraq War battlefield. Nor did it dull the competitive fire of the avid runner and former high school athlete from outside Kansas City. Mason competed in a triathlon within five months of losing part of his left arm, absorbing shrapnel, and suffering a collapsed lung. He soon returned to his SEAL unit.
“He could have gotten out of combat,” said family friend Elizabeth Frogge. “He just insisted on going back.” Mason, the father of two toddler sons, grew up in Holt, Mo., and played football and baseball at Kearney High School. Frogge said. “He loved doing what he did,” she said. “He was the type of guy who thought he was invincible.”

Stephen M. Mills (NAVY SEAL)

Special Warfare Operator Chief Petty Officer (SEAL) Stephen M. Mills of Fort Worth, Texas, was one of 30 soldiers killed on Aug. 6, 2011, in a CH-47 Chinook helicopter crash in Wardak province, Afghanistan. Before joining the SEALS, Mills served on the now-decommissioned Spruance-class destroyer Kinkaid for three years. He completed BUD/S training in 2001 and moved from a west coast SEAL team to an east coast SEAL team in March 2005. Mills is the recipient of several decorations, including two Bronze Star Medals with ‘V’ device for valor, a Joint Service Commendation Medal with ‘V’ device for valor, four Navy/Marine Corps Achievement Medals (one with ‘V’ device for valor), a Combat Action Ribbon, a Presidential Unit Citation, and many more.
His cousin, Tina Mills Cunningham, remembered him by saying, “He was always giving to other people, and he loved his country.”

Nicholas H. Null (USN)

Nick Null enlisted in the U.S. Navy on September 20, 2000, and completed basic training at NTC Great Lakes, Illinois, in November 2000. Null next attended Gunner’s Mate A School at Great Lakes from December 2000 to May 2001 and then served with Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 6 at Panama City, Florida, from May 2001 to September 2003. During this time, he participated in combat operations in Iraq during the opening phase of Operation Iraqi Freedom in March 2003. Petty Officer Null next attended Explosive Ordnance Disposal training from September 2003 to September 2004, followed by service with Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 2 at Virginia Beach, Virginia, from September 2004 to January 2009. During this time, he again deployed to Iraq from January to May 2006, January to July 2007, and August to December 2008. He also deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan from February to July 2005 and January to June 2006, concurrently with one of his deployments to Iraq. His final assignment was with the Naval Special Warfare Development Group at Dam Neck, Virginia, from January 2009 until he was killed in the crash of the CH-47 Chinook helicopter “Extortion 17” in Afghanistan on August 6, 2011. Nick Null was buried at Sunset Memory Gardens in Parkersburg, West Virginia.

Robert J. Reeves (NAVY SEAL)

Heath M. Robinson (NAVY SEAL)

Darrik C. Benson (NAVY SEAL)

Christopher G. Campbell (NAVY SEAL)

Jared W. Day (NAVY SEAL)

John Douangdara (NAVY SEAL)

Michael J. Strange (NAVY SEAL)

Jon T. Tumilson (NAVY SEAL)

Aaron C. Vaughn (NAVY SEAL)

Jason R. Workman (NAVY SEAL)

Jesse D. Pittman (NAVY SEAL)

Nicholas P. Spehar (NAVY SEAL)

David R. Carter (US ARMY)

Spencer C. Duncan (ARMY)

John W. Brown (USAF)

Andrew W. Harvell (USAF)

Daniel L. Zerbe (USAF)

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Sean Flynn :

 (SOC SEAL) (1970-2009):

On February 1, 2009, SOC (SEAL) Sean Flynn peacefully passed away from cancer. He was a highly decorated Special Operations Chief who earned three Bronze Stars with Valor and numerous other awards. Chief Flynn loved skydiving and was a certified advanced free fall instructor, tandem master, and an avid free flyer. He was attached to an East Coast-based SEAL team.

David Hall :

 (Navy SEAL) (1972-2020)

On February 1, 2009, SOC (SEAL) Sean Flynn peacefully passed away from cancer. He was a highly decorated Special Operations Chief who earned three Bronze Stars with Valor and numerous other awards. Chief Flynn loved skydiving and was a certified advanced free fall instructor, tandem master, and an avid free flyer. He was attached to an East Coast-based SEAL team.

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